Expelled Exposed on YouTube

29 04 2008

Stay tuned to ExpelledExposed’s Videos at YouTube for further instalments, or check the Expelled Exposed website.

Advertisements

Actions

Information

6 responses

29 04 2008
Doris Tracey

I think science is a wonderful way to learn about life and I think we are both a creation and an evolution. Since religion was taken out of the public schools children & teachers seem to not have any more direction in life. I think science and religion are twin pillars in a civilization and neither should be ignored. The public schools have really gone down the tubes. If parents desire to have religion put back in the public schools then the majority should rule. Children deeply learn about themselves from both. The hidden word in omniscience is science. Life is all science. I think religion is the scientific application of the law. I think all ideas come forth from another realm of existence and if we make contact with that realm, through prayer, then our real invisible teachers will guide us into a great civilization. I think we can either evolve or de-evolute depending on our free. I think we de-evoluted to the point of the cave man. That was mans fall, not our beginning. Religion and science are progressive and we should continue to learn and grow from both. The bible needs progressive revelation. Light has always been the King of creation and that light is universal & triumphant.

29 04 2008
AV

I think religion has a place in public schools too, but not in a way I imagine you would agree with. Given the variety of religious traditions in the world and the influence of religious belief upon major historical events (e.g. 9/11), it is as vital that students be provided access to comparative religious studies programmes–offering scholarly approaches to the world’s religions–as it is that they learn about other countries, other ethnicities, political philosophies, and so on.

Indoctrinating public school students in the dogmas of a particular religion (namely Biblical Christianity, which you seem to be arguing for) constitutes a denial of their religious freedom, and has no place in a secular liberal democracy. It would also constitute the establishment of a state church, given that the state would be privileging one particular denominational religious perspective over others, and this would be unjust not only to non-believers, and not only to members of non-Christian religions, but also to members of those Christian denominations whose beliefs are not represented.

Since religion was taken out of the public schools children & teachers seem to not have any more direction in life. I think science and religion are twin pillars in a civilization and neither should be ignored. The public schools have really gone down the tubes.

Post hoc ergo propter hoc fallacy.

If parents desire to have religion put back in the public schools then the majority should rule.

Not at the expense of individual freedom of conscience. In any case, there would be no majority, since each parent (if they were so inclined) would desire to have their own religious denomination’s dogmas forced upon children at public schools.

30 04 2008
saintlewis

Wow. Those rebutal folks seem VERY desperate. Sad.

30 04 2008
Sean the Blogonaut

@St Lewis,

Rebuttal folks?

@AV,

Said it better than I could have.

30 04 2008
Bruce

@St Lewis,

Wha?!?!

@AV,

Post hoc ergo propter hoc is one of my fav fallacies to call out.

@Sean,

Thanks for the new template!

30 04 2008
AV

Wow. Those rebutal folks seem VERY desperate. Sad.

As opposed to a “documentary”–with a current rating of 9% on Rotten Tomatoes–that attempts to blame the Holocaust on Charles Darwin (how’s that for Holocaust revisionism?), fronted by a man who believes science (the very thing that made his documentary possible) “leads to killing people“? As opposed to the film’s producers, who had to resort to bribing schools with cash offers of up to $5000 in order to get bums on seats? As opposed to the filmmakers who–counter to one of the Ten Commandments of their religion–lied to interviewees about the nature of the documentary?

You’re paying for that irony meter you just broke.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s




%d bloggers like this: