Feel like bashing a disgusting fundamentalist?

10 02 2009

Here’s what I just posted at Pharyngula, in response to this story.

Isn’t this the same man who had a dream that Peter Costello would one day be Prime Minister of Australia in the fifth term of the Howard Government (which never happened)?

Actually, God told him so, and it was on the basis of that conversation that Nalliah could “boldly” declare” (in August 2007) that John Howard would be re-elected in November 2007. God told Nalliah to spend “personal time” with (former Prime Minister) Howard and to prepare (former Treasurer) Costello as the future Prime Minister.

Well, God pwned Danny Nalliah. Nalliah, true to the form of the lying hypocritical fundie, subsequently refused to eat humble pie. As did many of his winged monkeys.

The man is a charlatan. His followers are case studies in self-delusion. Theirs is a worldview, as PZ’s post demonstrates, that feeds off human misery and fear.

Via Sean, here’s the Australian Skeptics’ media release on Nalliah’s parasitism:

Christians Exploit Catastrophe

Australia has been in shock since the Victorian bushfires in early February, resulting in the destruction of almost one thousand homes and the deaths of hundreds of people.

While some offer practical relief in the form of food and clothing donations, others look for someone to blame.

Catch the Fire Ministries (CTFM) in Dandenong, Victoria, published a media release today, blaming a new Australian law for the devastating bushfires, and further claim that the fires were foretold in a spiritual vision.

The CTFM leader, Pastor Danny Nalliah, announced that he had predicted the bushfires in a dream he had in October 2008. In this dream, he had a prophesy that the fires would occur, as divine retribution for an abortion decriminalisation bill that passed in Victoria in 2008. Nalliah calls Victoria the “baby killing state of Australia.”

The Ministry’s response is to petition God for forgiveness, and to commence a seven day prayer and fasting campaign. “In our prayer and fasting campaign, we are particularly repenting for the passing of the “Decriminalization of Abortion Laws of Victoria” in addition to other unrighteous, ungodly, and unjust laws and practices which have seen a holocaust of some of the most helpless members of the human race, the unborn.”

“Can we stop the fires? Yes we can! But it will take God’s children to rally together and repent and cry unto Him as in 2 Chronicles 7:14 (The Holy Bible). We at CTFM have seen this happen several times in the past in Australia, which was also covered by many mainstream media outlets.”

The CTFM website calls upon the “Australian Bible-believing God-fearing Christians to repent and call upon the Lord Jesus Christ for His mercy and protection over Australia once again.”

Visitors to the CTFM website can comment on the media release. However, skeptical replies are immediately deleted.

Representatives of the Australian Skeptics condemn the Catch the Fire Ministry for their uncritical, discriminatory beliefs and exploitation of the tragic events to promote their ministry.

Advertisements

Actions

Information

16 responses

10 02 2009
seantheblogonaut

Just posted on this myself. Nalliah is an arsehole opportunist.

10 02 2009
Anja

And the gutless sods at Catch The Bullshit, whoops silly me, Fire ministries will not allow any negative comments on their disgusting site.

10 02 2009
ozatheist

Nalliah is a disgusting example of what can happen when you believe in bullshit, and his team at CTFM are gutless.

10 02 2009
Bruce

Muehlenberg hasn’t been bone idle on the issue either. Perhaps Bill deserves another Bill Muehlenberg trophy for this effort.

10 02 2009
Sean the Blogonaut

@Bruce,

I found Bill’s piece a bit meandering. And basically concludes, god is mysterious lets pray and do something practical. His comments is where the batshit crazy begins.

10 02 2009
arthurvandelay

Anja:

And the gutless sods at Catch The Bullshit, whoops silly me, Fire ministries will not allow any negative comments on their disgusting site.

No, they won’t. I guess their deity is too weak to invest them with the intellectual wherewithal to withstand criticism.

Bruce:

Muehlenberg hasn’t been bone idle on the issue either. Perhaps Bill deserves another Bill Muehlenberg trophy for this effort.

Muehlenberg is another intellectual apologist giant who lacks the intellectual wherewithal to withstand criticism, judging by his commenting policy. But I won’t waste my time with his piece, except to remark that a man who claims that the questions of theodicy are big enough to fill entire libraries (where are these libraries?), too big for him for him to sort out in a blog post, and yet will in the very same blog post wave away entire philosophies (or strawman depictions thereof) with throwaway lines, has forfeited the right to be taken seriously.

At least he doesn’t seem to be attributing the bushfires to God’s righteous wrath. Though he does hold with the quaint notion that “sin” entered the world because Adam and Eve ate an apple, a crime of such depravity that it somehow stamped itself on the human genome, such that a newborn baby can be described as a “sinner” and worthy of eternal torture in the fires of Hell by default. And in the same breath he affirms a belief in free will. Aren’t Christians funny?

10 02 2009
seantheblogonaut

@anja,

…but not funny ha-ha

11 02 2009
Neil

No Christian I know would regard such primitive theodicy with anything but sadness or even contempt. Regard instead the work being done by various church agencies such as the Salvation Army without the self-indulgence of prophetic posturing.

11 02 2009
seantheblogonaut

@Neil,

I think most people regardless of their faith would find this man’s ideas to be abbhorent. What I think we do need is some christian leaders condemning him. The haven’t as yet.

11 02 2009
Neil

@ Sean.

See Uniting Church says now is not the time to blame.

The President of the Uniting Church Rev Gregor Henderson has today expressed total abhorrence towards organisations and individuals claiming that the devastation caused by the Victorian bushfires is the result of a vengeful God.

“The horror and grief we are continuing to experience as these fires rage on are the horrendous results of a natural disaster and the possible devastating consequences of human criminality,” said Rev. Gregor Henderson….

“To suggest that the loss of life from these bushfires is the reaction of God towards the Victorian people for decisions made by Government is not only ludicrous, it misapprehends the nature of God, the giver of life.

“God is not punishing the people of Victoria, so many of whom lost their lives, and so many more who are working day and night to fight fires, support the victims, and provide food, clothing and shelter.

“God is, in fact, there with the people, in the middle of their suffering; God is made known through the love that is extended to those most in need.”

Mr Henderson said that in the weeks and months to come, it would be vital for the Australian community, including churches and other faith groups, to continue to band together to support the people of Victoria, offering comfort, service and love.

11 02 2009
seantheblogonaut

@Neil,

Good pickup mate, will post about it myself. Lets hope more join in.

11 02 2009
Sammy Jankis

Though [Bill] does hold with the quaint notion that “sin” entered the world because Adam and Eve ate an apple, a crime of such depravity that it somehow stamped itself on the human genome, such that a newborn baby can be described as a “sinner” and worthy of eternal torture in the fires of Hell by default.

And he accuses non-theists of having a low view of humanity if they accept evolution: “You think we came from monkeys, but I prefer the view that we a filthy wretched sinners who deserve nothing less than eternal damnation”.

And in the same breath he affirms a belief in free will.

That’s what I find interesting. He whinges about non-theists and their supposed embrace of determinism, and yet when you ask him how atheists can be good without believing he says “Well, you see, the only reason any of us do anything good is because we are created in God’s image. So when we do something good it is not us, it’s Him“. By the same token, we are bad because we are infected with sin – we can’t help but do bad things due to our fallen nature.

Doesn’t his claim to free will fit poorly with these propositions?

12 02 2009
AV

Neil:

Fair enough. Stephen Clark has also taken a swipe at Nalliah on his blog.

Obviously Rev. Henderson’s heart is in the right place. I have to observe, however, that in his own way he is doing something similar to Nalliah: making claims about what a deity thinks about a human disaster, as well as making claims about whether or not said deity is responsible for the disaster.

(1) How would either of them know?

And (2) What difference does it make, anyway? Why does it matter, why ought it matter what a supernatural being, whose existence is assumed but not demonstrated, thinks about the bushfire disaster? Why ought the posited but undemonstrated sympathy of someone’s god matter to the victims, who surely could take far greater solace in the very real and very demonstrable empathy of their fellow human beings, across Australia and across the world?

12 02 2009
Neil

What difference does it make, anyway?

In sheer logic you may be right, but the fact is what Henderson said would be very comforting to many people, and in the circumstances I think that might even override sheer logic.

12 02 2009
arthurvandelay

It isn’t even really a matter of “sheer logic”, Neil. I’m sure many Christians, as you commented above, would disavow Nalliah’s remarks. I doubt they need Henderson’s own pontifications on what God is thinking or doing with regard to the crisis to reassure them of what they undoubtedly believe already. Not that I’m really out to attack Henderson, whose brand of Christianity I obviously prefer to Nalliah’s, but I think his closing remarks (as quoted above) are the most valuable, emphasising as they do the value of human solidarity (whatever a deity might think).

12 02 2009
Neil

“God thinks” is itself an interesting expression, I agree, and we agree — you and I that is — on Henderson’s closing remarks; however, his statement was after all in a church publication and addressed to an audience for who such language may not present not as “pontification” but as simply the language of the tribe… I am sure Henderson would not really assert he literally knows what God thinks. He is reminding the Uniting Church about the way he believes the UC sees/portrays God, which isn’t quite the same as knowing what God thinks.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s




%d bloggers like this: